HendricksonOrgan.com - Opus 106 - Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN  
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Manual I (58 notes)
8 Bourdon
4 Principal

Manual II (58 notes)
8 Spillflöte
2 Principal

Pedal (32 notes)
8 Principal
4 Choral Bass

Opus 106
Minnesota State University
Mankato, MN

 
The 6-rank studio organ at Minnesota State University, Mankato has been built by the Hendrickson Organ Company of St. Peter, Minnesota.  The concept and development of the project was directed by Professor Linda Duckett, Chair of the Music Department.  The design of the organ, its construction and installation was headed by Charles Hendrickson.  Charles' sons Eric and Andreas and their associates were the craftsmen for the project, which was completed in 2005.

The organ is designed for student studies and examination.  Its sounds are mild, but crisp and precise in order to give the students an accurate response to their musical intentions and desires.  It quickly points out musical problems for the students to practice on and solve.  It is not a church or concert organ, but is the starting point for studies which will lead the student to a professional career and musical maturity.

The organ contains two manuals and pedal, and these keys are connected to the wind chests of the organ by mechanical (tracker) connections.  When a key or pedal is pressed, a wood or metal connection to the wind valves will open those valves and allow the pipes to speak quickly and directly.  This precision and directness imparts a rapid mind-finger or mind-toe ability which is vital for student learning.

The organ contains 284 copper and pewter pipes.  The organ is unusual as a new instrument for student pipe organ studies at a state university, and a tribute to the long-term vitality of such studies at MSU.

 

  Hendrickson staff with Dr. Linda Duckett, MSU organ professor. 

 

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